Rugby

Rugby Tap

A pub with no bar! A micro-pub to be precise, no confusion whatsoever here. Quite busy at half past four on a Friday afternoon. I think we got the last spare seats.

I’d get really annoyed having to constantly bend down to draw a pint from the bottom rack. You’d think after four years they’d have found a better way of doing it? Nice chap though. I’m still not convinced casks with cooling saddles and insulated jackets is the way forward. I’ve had this discussion with various people and I’d really want a proper cellar if I opened up a micro-pub.

When I say a proper cellar, I mean a proper cellar and not the undercroft of a modern build retail unit, there is a big difference. I’ve been impressed with some of the ad-hoc cellars constructed at the back of some micro-pubs and the quality of the beer proves they can work. But for me I’d really want a proper cellar. 

It just makes you think how long these, almost a permanent beer festival in a shop places, can keep going with all this global warming and climate change? American readers can ignore the last bit because we know it doesn’t officially exist over there.

Anyway, it does work because the pint of Church End Gravedigger (3.8%) was pretty decent at NBSS 3 and cheap at £3.10. They also had Best Bitter from Church End, an Oakham ‘Experimental’, Nobby’s Best Bitter and two from Byatt’s Platinum Blonde and Stone Bears a Belgian influenced pale.

I didn’t examine the nine boxes of real cider for evidence of cooling. The range and enthusiasm in promoting real cider has to be commended but unless it’s properly cooled then they’re best avoided. 

For me, the best way to keep cider is in the cellar and pulled through a hand pump. Yet another aspect where quality always exceeds quantity and I’d sooner Hobson’s Choice of a cool, fresh pint of cider than choose from a dozen warm ‘uns.

Plus points; disabled friendly, interesting floor made from old wooden cases, comfy seats and everything very clean. On the down side, it was bit rattly with everyone chattering away, but that’s what you get when you set up a pub in an old shop.

So how long will all these micro-pubs last? Will they keep coming or will they dwindle away? They probably will keep coming as Pubco’s and the dynamics of the property market mean that most people would find it hard to raise the capital to purchase a traditional pub property. Whereas everything in a low cost start up like this could, in a morning, be thrown in the back of a van and returned to the furniture repository. All you’d see is a ‘To Let’ sign and no one would ever know there’d ever been a pub on the site.

History tells us that whatever comes in the pub trade, eventually we will be left with little remnants from different eras, a patchwork of what has gone before. I bet you there will still be an odd estate pub knocking around in one hundred years time, and people will marvel about it, flock to it, go on days out to enjoy it.

6 replies »

  1. A lot of micropubs are essentially the vision of their founder and may not survive him or her retiring and wanting to sell it on. Having said that, they can easily be converted back to other forms of retail use. Yes, some will certainly survive, but I expect to see a lot of churn in the coming years.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Richard Coldwell Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.